Seafood and Sleep: The Catch of the Day

crab on sand

What do warm milk, chamomile tea, and seafood all have in common? One of these things may seem like it’s not like the others, but they can all help you fall asleep faster. Whether it’s fish or crustaceans, many types of seafood provide your body with certain essential nutrients that will help lull you into dreamland.

Something fishy is going on

Fish like tuna, halibut, and salmon are particularly high in vitamin B6. Vitamin B6 helps in the production of melatonin and serotonin. A study from the University of Pennsylvania also found a link between fish consumption and high sleep quality, regardless of the type of fish. Fish have omega-3 fatty acids, which have been linked to numerous health benefits, but namely higher cognitive function. The relationship was made from fish consumption to better sleep to higher cognitive functioning.

The power of hibernation for a crustacean

Crustaceans like lobster and crab contain tryptophan. Tryptophan is an essential amino acid that helps to balance nitrogen in adults and creates niacin, which is essential in creating serotonin. Tryptophan is usually discussed around turkey dinner at Thanksgiving, but there are other foods that contain higher amounts of this amino acid than you may have realized. It’s not just the full belly from the all-you-can-eat crab legs that make you sleepy after the meal after all.

Bait the hook for better sleep

If you are headed to the beach for summer vacation, make sure to take advantage of the fresh seafood (as long as you’re not allergic!) to help aide in more restorative sleep. Some have trouble sleeping while on vacation due to new surroundings, but if the quality of your sleep is higher while on vacation, you will return home feeling more relaxed and refreshed than if you had tossed and turned. When you’re back home, adding a weekly meal of fish from fresh or saltwater will help to increase fish consumption, and in turn, help with sleep quality.

Sources:

https://www.rd.com/health/wellness/foods-that-help-you-sleep/

http://time.com/5077404/fish-omega-3-sleep/

https://www.healthline.com/health/tryptophan/

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